English Knowledge - SPLessons

Homonyms

Chapter 13

SPLessons 5 Steps, 3 Clicks
5 Steps - 3 Clicks

Homonyms

Homonyms

shape Description

Homonyms are defined as one of a gathering of words that have the same pronunciation yet have different meanings, whether spelled the same or not.
Adjectives: homonymic and homonymous.

The adjective word homonymous can also be utilized wherever two things have the same name, free of how close they are or aren’t connected as far as their importance or etymology.

shape Concept

In non-technical topics, the expression “homonym” might be utilized to refer to words that are either homographs or homophones.

“The reason that there is disarray and an absence of clarity over homonym is that it is firmly identified with two different words, homograph and homophone.

Homographs: A homograph is a word that is spelt differently to another word yet none the less has an alternate significance and most likely an alternate source.
Example – You will without a doubt be irritated if that you tear your trousers while moving over a wall.
To be sure, you might be upset to the point that you shed a tear.
By the above sentences, “tear” and “tear” are spelt identically, yet they are pronounced differently and have totally different meanings.
Numerous homographs are not by any means pronounced in an unexpected way.

Homographs: A homophone is a word that sounds precisely like another word, yet has an alternate importance and an alternate spelling.
Example – bark (the sound of a dog) and bark (the skin of a tree).

It is possible for a word to be a homograph or a homophone. However, whatever the word might be, it is additionally, by definition, a homonym. In other words, homonym is a calculated word that grasps both homographs and homophones.

shape Model Questions

1. Two sentences numbered I and II are given. In these sentences, two homonyms are given in italics type, which may be either mis-spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentences. Read both the sentences carefully and decide on their correctness on the basis of the italicized words. (NABARD Exam, 1994)
I. An ordnance declaring president’s rule in the state has been issued today.
II. The ordinance depot is situated far way from this city.
Options: –
A. If only sentence I is correct.
B. If only sentence II is correct.
C. If both the sentences I and II are correct.
D. If I as well as II are incorrect, but both could be made correct by Interchanging the italicised words.
E. If neither I nor II is correct and the sentence could not be made correct by interchanging the italicized words.
Solution: Ordinance = enactment
Ordnance = military stores
Hence option D is the right answer.

2. Two sentences numbered I and II are given. In these sentences, two homonyms are given in italics type, which may be either mis-spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentences. Read both the sentences carefully and decide on their correctness on the basis of the italicized words. (NABARD Exam, 1994)
I. He won the election only because of the support he got from his zealous party workers.
II. Alice’s friends were jaelous of her success in the prestigious competition.
Options: –
A. If only sentence I is correct.
B. If only sentence II is correct.
C. If both the sentences I and II are correct.
D. If I as well as II are incorrect, but both could be made correct by Interchanging the italicised words.
E. If neither I nor II is correct and the sentence could not be made correct by interchanging the italicized words.
Solution: The correct word in II should be ‘jealous’.
Zealous = full of zeal
Jealous = envious
Hence option A is the right answer.

3. Two sentences numbered I and II are given. In these sentences, two homonyms are given in italics type, which may be either mis-spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentences. Read both the sentences carefully and decide on their correctness on the basis of the italicized words. (NABARD Exam, 1994)
I. The tragic tale narrated by the old man affected all the children.
II. The humane attitude of the new manager efected a profound change in labour relation.
Options: –
A. If only sentence I is correct.
B. If only sentence II is correct.
C. If both the sentences I and II are correct.
D. If I as well as II are incorrect, but both could be made correct by Interchanging the italicised words.
E. If neither I nor II is correct and the sentence could not be made correct by interchanging the italicized words.
Solution: The correct word in II should be ‘effected’.
Effect = result
Affect = to influence
Hence, option A is the right answer.

4. Two sentences numbered I and II are given. In these sentences, two homonyms are given in italics type, which may be either mis-spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentences. Read both the sentences carefully and decide on their correctness on the basis of the italicized words. (Bank PO, 1995)
I. I think this electric metre is faulty.
II. I require two meters of cloth for this purpose.
Options: –
A. If only sentence I is correct.
B. If only sentence II is correct.
C. If both the sentences I and II are correct.
D. If I as well as II are incorrect, but both could be made correct by Interchanging the italicised words.
E. If neither I nor II is correct and the sentence could not be made correct by interchanging the italicized words.
Solution: Metre = a measuring apparatus
Meter = unit of length
Hence, option D is the right answer.

5. Two sentences numbered I and II are given. In these sentences, two homonyms are given in italics type, which may be either mis-spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentences. Read both the sentences carefully and decide on their correctness on the basis of the italicized words. (Bank P.O. 1995)
I. Some of the African immigrants indulge in smuggling in our country.
II. Many emmigrants from India have settled in America.
Options: –
A. If only sentence I is correct.
B. If only sentence II is correct.
C. If both the sentences I and II are correct.
D. If I as well as II are incorrect, but both could be made correct by Interchanging the italicised words.
E. If neither I nor II is correct and the sentence could not be made correct by interchanging the italicized words.
Solution: The correct word in II should be ‘migrants’.
Emigrant = one who leaves his country to settle in any other country.
Immigrant = one who enters a country to settle there.
Hence, option A is the right answer.